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Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology

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172. The relation between cognitive control and depression outcome in a naturalistic psychiatric setting.

Many individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) experience significant impairment in executive functioning. Although a few studies have examined the relation between cognitive control and depression treatment outcome within the context of controlled clinical trials, to our knowledge no study has tested whether impaired cognitive control, assessed via a validated behavioral task and electroencephalography (EEG), predicts treatment outcome in a naturalistic psychiatric setting. The present study administered a flanker task, while recording EEG data, to depressed patients receiving combined cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy at McLean Hospital’s Behavioral Health Partial Program (BHP). Data collection is ongoing, but thus far thirty-seven adults with MDD ages 18-69 (57.1% males) were administered a flanker task at the beginning of their BHP stay. With the current sample size, there is a non-significant association between depression scores at the time of BHP discharge (mean treatment length = 13 days) and both baseline flanker interference on accuracy (b = -.31 p = .167) and theta power to flanker errors (b=-.15 p = .550). Behavioral (flanker accuracy) and EEG (theta power) data collection is ongoing (planned n = 200), and analyses will be conducted testing whether these behavioral and neural markers of cognitive control predict treatment outcome.

Nathaniel Lovell-Smith
Mclean Psychiatric Hospital

Elana Israel
Mclean Psychiatric Hospital

Courtney Beard
Mclean Psychiatric Hospital

Kristen Christensen
Mclean Psychiatric Hospital

Throstur Bjorgvinsson
Mclean Psychiatric Hospital

Diego A. Pizzagalli
Mclean Psychiatric Hospital

Christian A. Webb
Mclean Psychiatric Hospital

 


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