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Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology

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104. Internalized Stigma as a Mediator between Psychosis Risk Symptoms and Quality of Life in a Help-Seeking Sample of Adolescents and Young Adults

Subjective quality of life can be compromised in individuals at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis, and is associated with worse functioning and later transition to psychosis (Fusar-Poli et al., 2015; Strobl et al., 2012). Quality of life also appears to be negatively related to stigma within this population (Gerlinger et al., 2013). Individuals who experience psychotic and psychotic-like symptoms tend to endorse more self-stigma when compared to controls, potentially contributing to delays in seeking treatment (Franz et al., 2010). Despite these findings, and the growing recognition for prevention in earlier phases of illness, few studies have examined the relation between positive symptoms, internalized stigma, and subjective quality of life in a younger, help-seeking sample.

This study will examine whether internalized stigma mediates the relation between psychosis-risk symptoms and subjective quality of life in a help-seeking sample of youth classified as non-psychosis-related psychiatric controls, CHR, or early psychosis. Symptom severity will be assessed using the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS; Miller et al., 2003). Internalized stigma will be assessed using the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Inventory (ISMI; Ritsher, Otilingam, & Grajales, 2003), and quality of life will be assessed using the Youth Quality of Life Instrument – Short Form (YQOL-SF; Patrick, Edwards, & Topolski, 2002).

Participant recruitment is ongoing, and results and discussion will be presented on the final sample. Preliminary analyses support our mediational hypothesis. Findings may inform efforts to improve quality of life for individuals in early stages of psychosis.

LeeAnn Shan
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Samantha Jay
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Samantha Redman
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Pamela Rakhshan Rouhaktar
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Joseph DeLuca
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Emily Petti University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Miranda Bridgwater
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Steven Pitts
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Gloria Reeves
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Alicia Lucksted
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Jason Schiffman
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

 


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