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Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology

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130. Using reaction time variability to detect subtle cognitive dysfunction through self-administered online cognitive assessment

Our objective for this study was to analyze the validity of online self-administered cognitive assessment in adults with chronic diseases and to determine whether performance variability from these tests can be used to detect cognitive differences. Using our online research laboratory, TestMyBrain.org, we administered measures of processing speed and attention to participants with Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and depression. Participants with diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2) had poorer performance relative to control participants (N=192 T1D and N=308 T2D; Z=-0.43, p<0.001), and greater within-test reaction time variability (Z=0.34, p<0.01), a metric associated with accelerated aging and poorer brain health. Participants with high depression symptoms (BDI-II) showed similar mean reaction times, but also showed higher reaction time variability relative to controls. These data suggest that variability assessed through self-administered online cognitive tests is a valid and potentially more sensitive method of assessing cognitive differences transdiagnostically, in adults with chronic mental as well as physical health conditions that are thought to impact neuropsychological function.

Luke Scheuer
Laboratory for Brain and Cognitive Health Technology, McLean Hospital

Naomi Chaytor
Elon S. Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University

Eliza Passell
Laboratory for Brain and Cognitive Health Technology, McLean Hospital

Laura Germine
Laboratory for Brain and Cognitive Health Technology, McLean Hospital

 


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