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Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology

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99. AFFECTIVE IMPAIRMENT, NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS AND OLFACTORY PERCEPTION AS A TRANSDIAGNOSTIC MARKER IN PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS

Olfaction is diminished in schizophrenia and has an especially strong association with negative symptoms. This relationship exists in other psychotic disorders as well, but no study has assessed the extent to which the symptom-olfaction relationship is transdiagnostic. Additionally, past work has not provided a fine-grained account of the symptom-dimensions that track components of olfactory deficits. In the present study a sample of cases with psychotic disorders (N=111) and never-psychotic adults (NP; N=136) were assessed using Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) as well as Sniffin Sticks tests of odor identification (ID) and discrimination (DIS). Overall, cases performed worse than NP on all olfaction measures. Hierarchical linear regression revealed that worse olfactory performance in cases was associated with emotional inexpressivity (but not avolition) over and above effects of gender and age. This effect appeared to be specific to DIS (partial r=-.245, p=.019) and unpleasant ID (partial r = -.335, p=.001). Importantly, these relationships were not further explained by either psychotic disorder sub-group or diagnosis-by-symptoms interaction, indicating a transdiagnostic effect. Present results highlight the specific symptom-dimensions associated with olfactory deficits in psychotic disorders and clarify the transdiagnositic nature of this association.

Emmett Larsen
Stony Brook University

Katherine Jonas
Stony Brook University School of Medicine

Kayla Donaldson
Stony Brook University

Maya Marder
Stony Brook University

Roman Kotov
Stony Brook University School of Medicine

Aprajita Mohanty
Stony Brook University

 


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