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Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology

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6. SUBSTANCE MISUSE AND EEG/BEHAVIORAL CORRELATES OF RESPONSE INHIBITION: ETIOLOGICAL INSIGHTS FROM A COTWIN CONTROL DESIGN

Deficits in inhibitory control are a core component of substance misuse and addiction. Alcohol and nicotine use are negatively associated with midfrontal theta during response inhibition. It is unclear whether this reflects a premorbid determinant or potential consequence of substance misuse. We assessed the relationship between problematic alcohol/nicotine misuse across emerging adulthood and theta-band EEG dynamics during a Go/Nogo task in a sample of 638 same-sex twins (age: M [SD] = 24.4 [0.8]; 346 women). A cotwin control (CTC) analysis differentiated alcohol/nicotine exposure effects from preexisting risk. Decreased nogo theta power was associated with greater drinking, number of hangovers/blackouts/binges, and cigarettes per day (CPD). As hypothesized given prior work, effects were only significant in women. CTC analysis indicated that within a twin pair, the heavier-using twin had lower theta compared to her lesser-using cotwin, suggesting an exposure-related effect of alcohol and nicotine misuse on nogo-related theta. There was also evidence of familial confounding between theta and drinking. Worse task performance (lower d-prime scores; greater false alarms) was linked to increased CPD in men and women and likely reflected a premorbid vulnerability. Problematic alcohol and nicotine use during emerging adulthood may have sex-specific substance exposure-related effects on frontal inhibition-related theta dynamics.

Funding: DA036216; Eva O. Miller Fellowship (University of Minnesota).

Jeremy Harper
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Stephen Malone
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Irene Elkins
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

William Iacono
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

 


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